Sunday, 16 July 2017

Standing in a Woodland Glade

Good news, I’ve found me a bit of ancient woodland to explore! It’s just up the road and is quiet and cool and teeming with life. One of my favourite things to do is to find a stretch of mixed habit, preferably with a good stand of nettles or brambles, and just watch and listen. A vigil for the tinniest movement or the slightest sound.


In this sunny glade last Tuesday, I was treated to 18 species of bird in just 15 minutes:
  1. Bullfinch
  2. Treecreeper
  3. Nuthatch
  4. Coal Tit
  5. Great Spotted Woodpecker
  6. Great Tit
  7. Blue Tit
  8. Blackcap
  9. Song Thrush
  10. Blackbird
  11. Goldcrest
  12. Chiffchaff
  13. Robin
  14. Wren
  15. Long-tailed Tit
  16. Woodpigeon
  17. Pheasant
  18. Swift
Not too far away, in a more open area, near the River Avon, there was a singing Lesser Whitethroat and Reed Warbler.

Butterflies were plentiful too, of 13 species, including half a dozen Silver-washed Fritillary:
  1. Silver-washed Fritillary
  2. Ringlet
  3. Meadow Brown
  4. Gatekeeper
  5. Small Skipper
  6. Large Skipper
  7. Large White
  8. Small White
  9. Peacock
  10. Small Tortoiseshell
  11. Red Admiral
  12. Comma
  13. Holly Blue
Behind me at this spot is a lovely big Honey Suckle, so I’m hoping White Admiral might be a possibility on another visit.

Below are just a few of the species that crossed my path during a wander on Wednesday



Silver-washed Fritillary Mrs Blackcap collecting food for young Resting Red Admiral
Female Southern Hawker Hornets visiting an old woodpecker nest site A super striking parasitic Wasp species
Chiffchaff hide & seek Song Thrush’s anvil, complete with snail shells Foraging Treecreeper

The parasitic wasp species was a new one to me and is perhaps Ichneumon extensorius, although narrowing down to species from a photograph isn’t really possible. I think this group of insects requires microscopic examination to positively identify.

6 comments:

  1. A belated welcome back Lucy - you've been sorely missed.

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    1. Very kind of you Steve, thank you. I'm afraid I've left that wonderful chalk grassland of the Chilterns but hopefully there'll be a few interesting things to find in/around Stratford-Upon-Avon/Warwick!

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  2. Lucy; Wherever you are I hope happiness isn't far away! Enjoy Shakespeare's county - Dyl

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    1. Here's hoping! Thanks Dyl - very much appreciated.

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  3. What a wonderful feast of wildlife and little critters! I'm so glad you are finding places that can feed your soul. From ARF

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  4. Looks like a path even I could get lost along. dyni

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